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Fossil dad: What's next on the front lines of the new reality?

As I write this over 800 folks in our great state died from the virus. A number to us, but one of them was a decades-old friend that I wrote about in a previous column. So now what do we do next?  Forget about the dead? Thank our lucky stars, and perhaps stripes, that it wasn’t one of us?
Taso Lagos is program director for Hellenic studies in the Jackson School of International Studies at the University of Washington. Photo credit: Patrick Luhrs.

Mill Creek resident Taso Lagos blogs about what it’s like being a middle-aged new parent in Mill Creek.

Another idea for what's next. As I write this over 800 folks in our great state died from the virus. A number to us, but one of them was a decades-old friend that I wrote about in a previous column. 

So now what do we do next?  Forget about the dead? Thank our lucky stars, and perhaps stripes, that it wasn’t one of us? Or simply shake our heads and focus on the light at the end of the tunnel?

I suggest we plant trees in their memory. 

A lot of details to be worked out, such as how to pay for this plan, where to plant the trees or even what trees to choose? etc.

We prefer to forget this time, the spring of our discontent.  We can’t wait for the return to what used to be called normal, and to put all this collective house arrest behind us. 

Forgetting would be a mistake. It’d show we learned nothing from it.

We build monuments to past wars and tragedies of one kind or another (think 9/11, etc.), yet here’s a plague that’s eaten close to 70,000 lives nationwide as I write this, with no immediate sign of letup, yet not a whisper of reflection on the larger meaning of this death virus.

Similar silence fell after the Spanish Influenza in 1920.  Nobody wanted to talk about it, let alone think about it.  And we got the Jazz Age afterwards, where everybody got drunk, despite the Prohibition against the sale and importation of alcohol, and sitting atop poles became the rage.

I hope we’re more sober this time.  I hope we accept viruses and germs are and have been part of our human history.  Maybe we commemorate the war or tragic dead from 9/11 because humans caused the killing. 

Corona is a microscopic virus. When this one disappears, a new one will emerge in its place. This is the inescapable fact of viruses. We are forever vulnerable to their spread, so long as we live and breathe and watch Neflix.  

Planting trees will remind us after this darkness has passed that we should always be vigilant from now on.

I always thought my wife was OCD when it came to germs.  I always stocked up on disinfectants and wipes from Costco because of her.

Thanks to her, we had a good supply of weapons against the germs when it hit.  Even now I still can’t get them at Costco. 

So, let’s plant a tree for each victim.  Let’s find a place to host these trees.  Let’s work with a nursery that can help us.  

We do not need to have another 800+ Washingtonians die in the future simply because we let amnesia rule the day.

Will you join me?

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Comments

Planting trees

What a wonderful tribute to those who have succumbed to the Corona virus. Thank you for taking the time to share this with your readers!

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