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Jackson High School senior earns international Young Scientist Award

Left to right: Meghana Bollimpalli, Oliver Nicholls, and Dhruvik Parikh won the top awards at the Intel ISEF 2018. Photo courtesy of Society For Science & The Public/Chris Ayers Photography.
Left to right: Meghana Bollimpalli, Oliver Nicholls, and Dhruvik Parikh won the top awards at the Intel ISEF 2018. Photo courtesy of Society For Science & The Public/Chris Ayers Photography.

From an Everett Public Schools News Release.

Dhruvik Parikh named Young Scientist, walks away with $58,000

Projects that rivaled a graduate student’s thesis, from diagnosing Parkinson’s disease through face imaging, to an autonomous window cleaning robot for high rise buildings, to an in-depth study of Asian weaver ants’ nesting behaviors. These high school students gathered from around the world to compete in the Intel International Science and Engineering Fair (ISEF) the third week of May 2018. 

As Dana Riley Black, district STEM, partnerships and legislation executive director put it; “It’s the equivalent of the Nobel Prize for high school students.”

Not only was the competition fierce, but the prizes were grand. The largest three prizes of the event ranged from $50,000 to $75,000. These were the big leagues and every student who waited to hear the winners announced, palms sweaty, in a sea of thousands, knew it.

Dhruvik Parikh from Jackson High School earned the Young Scientist Award of $50,000 for his project titled, A Novel Sol-Gel Derived SPEEK/Silicon Dioxide Composite Membrane for the Vanadium Redox Flow Battery.

In addition to winning the Intel Foundation Young Scientist Award, Parikh won first place and best-in-category in the chemical energy category, bringing his total winnings to $58,000. Impressed yet?

Parikh shared, “I would like to express my gratitude to Ms. Kimberly Griggs, Dr. Kevin Kukla, Mr. Andy Sevald, Ms. Carole Tanner, and all of the other Everett Public Schools staff members for their key roles in my development as a scientist, student, and person.

Parikh plans to attend Stanford University in the fall, where he will study Materials Science and Computer Science. He plans to join a lab and conduct academic research as an undergraduate and then enter the world of research and development for clean energy startups upon graduating. “Eventually, I would like to found my own startup based on my research,” Parikh wrote.

Students at the event were ninth through twelfth graders who earned the right to compete at Intel ISEF 2018 by winning a top prize at a local, regional, state, or national science fair.

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