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Forever home cat of the week - Meowshawn Lynch

Meowshawn is a very sweet 14 week old male. Opposite of his beastly namesake, this little guy is a love-bug. Meowshawn was trapped with his three siblings in a trailer park when he was six weeks old. He has been fostered in a busy household with five adult cats, a teenage cat, and a small dog. He loves to play with the “big kitties” and would do best in a home with another cat (or two or three).

Optimize spring health with Ayurveda, by Kate Towell

In spring, nature comes alive—with the arrival of spring showers that cleanse the accumulated stores from the winter. We begin to feel more energetic and spend more time outdoors, open the windows and shed our heavy coats. Spring is the season of celebration.

During seasonal transitions we celebrate the wondrous changes in nature. In the spring we enjoy the cherry blossoms, the happy songs of the birds and the arrival of our favorite flowers. In spring, nature comes alive—with the arrival of spring showers that cleanse the accumulated stores from the winter. We begin to feel more energetic and spend more time outdoors, open the windows and shed our heavy coats. Spring is the season of celebration.

Forever home cat of the week - Puma

Approximately two years old, Puma may look like a black panther, but she is really an angel in disguise! Puma was found roaming around a schoolyard trying to make friends with all the kids. She loved the attention, purring and rubbing up against the children who were able to pet her.

Approximately two years old, Puma may look like a black panther, but she is really an angel in disguise! Puma was found roaming around a schoolyard trying to make friends with all the kids. She loved the attention, purring and rubbing up against the children who were able to pet her. This sweet, friendly girl hung around the school because she was evidently homeless and looking for food and companionship. She was gobbling up any food she was given or could find.

Time to get those cool season veggies planted, from the Whistling Gardener

March is the consummate month to plant “cool season” veggies like potatoes and carrots and onions and radishes, leaf crops like lettuce and spinach and cabbage and broccoli and finally peas. All of these crops demand a cool soil and cool air temperatures.

March is the consummate month to plant “cool season” veggies like potatoes and carrots and onions and radishes, leaf crops like lettuce and spinach and cabbage and broccoli and finally peas. All of these crops demand a cool soil and cool air temperatures to perform their best. When it starts to get too warm they will mature rapidly and go to seed.

Forever home dog of the week - Yoda

Yoda is a 15 week old Chihuahua mix boy that weighs 8-9 lbs. He was transferred to Seattle with his siblings from a high-kill shelter in California and just arrived in our rescue.

Yoda is a 15 week old Chihuahua mix boy that weighs 8-9 lbs. He was transferred to Seattle with his siblings from a high-kill shelter in California and just arrived in our rescue.

Yoda is a little shy but will come out of his shell once he feels comfortable in his surroundings. He is a bit hesitant towards humans at first but is overcoming that. He loves being around other dogs and enjoys playing with them. He does tend to be submissive in nature.

Left Coast/Right Coast: Now that’s comedy

What is funny? The answer is so subjective that I suggest your culture has a lot to do with it.

What is funny? The answer is so subjective that I suggest your culture has a lot to do with it.

Watch Albert Brooks’ movie “Looking for Comedy in the Muslim World.” One of the funniest movies (to me) I’ve ever seen. In it he is sent by our State Department to figure out what makes Muslims in India and Pakistan laugh. Only a Government Agency could ask for this deliverable: “Write a 500 page report on what’s funny.”

Brooks gives a stand up comedy performance in India and since virtually no one in the audience understands his comedy, of course, no one laughs. For example, he talks about things commonly understood by Americans (like turning down the house lights – otherwise no one will laugh). He realizes that unless the local population has had this type of experience, they could not be expected to laugh.

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