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Whistling Gardener Blog

"Competing with the holiday bazaars. Come make a wreath!" by the Whistling Gardener

Wreath making now a days is a piece of cake. With wreath machines and wire forms it is so easy that you will amaze yourself with your creativity.

The Whistling Gardener suggests making a holiday wreath. Wreath making now a days is a piece of cake. With wreath machines and wire forms it is so easy that you will amaze yourself with your creativity. Your wreath will look nothing like the cookie-cutter ones you see in the stores.

Hellebores are hard to beat for winter interest, from the Whistling Gardener

Hellebores are tough as nails and rarely need to be divided once they are planted.

If you are looking for a sturdy perennial that will grow in shade or morning sun then look no further than Hellebores. These perennials are tough as nails and rarely need to be divided once they are planted. Mostly disease free and only occasionally visited by aphids they are easy to grow and non-demanding.

"It’s time to plant bulbs," from the Whistling Gardener

Bulbs can be exciting contrary to what they might look like stuffed into a netted bag with a two dimensional photo attached. All it takes to enjoy bulbs is a little vision and a willingness to be patient.

Bulbs can be exciting contrary to what they might look like stuffed into a netted bag with a two dimensional photo attached. All it takes to enjoy bulbs is a little vision and a willingness to be patient. Most bulbs are perennials and will multiply and increase in size and spread every year so they are a good investment. Here are few of my tips on planting bulbs.

"My October to do list," from the Whistling Gardener

There are still some late bloomers that look great: asters, mums, Japanese anemones, cone flowers, Russian sage, sedum and toad lilies to name just a few.

It is official. As of the 24th of this month the days are now shorter than the nights and will continue to be so for the next six months. While that might sound depressing the fact is that Mother Nature doesn’t seem to be bothered by it. In fact, there are actually plants that seem to wake up in the winter and bloom and set fruit while the rest of us are hunkered down in our homes.

"In pursuit of the perfect lawn," from the Whistling Gardener

Originally reserved for the aristocracy, lawns slowly trickled down to the working class and in the US after WWII they became synonymous with suburbia.

The Whistling Gardener's column is about being in pursuit of the perfect lawn.

Let’s face it, for the most part the lawn is the man’s domain. It is literally his “turf” and when left alone he can spend endless hours mowing, edging, aerating, dethatching, feeding, reseeding, watering and weeding not to mention the time it takes to keep his trusty John Deere steed in good running condition.

Fall is a lot like spring only better, from the Whistling Gardener

In this last week of August take stock of your beds and if you are ready to pull out the summer annuals then do it now, spade in some new compost and organic fertilizer.

It’s hard to believe that I am talking about fall when it is still high summer and there is a good one to two months left of decent weather.

In this last week of August take stock of your beds and if you are ready to pull out the summer annuals then do it now, spade in some new compost and organic fertilizer and let the beds breathe for a week or two while you think about what you want to plant for the fall.

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